1. Ghost of a Mist (the sleepwalker) [15:16] MP3 soundclip of Ghost of a mist (the sleepwalker) [4:00]
  2. In Timeroom Spirits [9:29]
  3. Ghost of a Mist (ring mist mountain) [15:34]
  4. On the Field [5:28]
  5. Flowing forces [9:20] MP3 soundclip of Flowing forces [4:00]
  6. Desert Clouds [18:47] MP3 soundclip of Desert clouds [4:00]
On his 2nd CD Ron worked together with Klaus Hoffmann-Hoock, founder of the German band Mind over Matter. The overall atmosphere is dreamy but the dynamic album closing Desert Clouds really puts you back on your feet!

This is the 2002 remaster plus bonus track "Flowing forces". Here is an album that is stopped by briefly in the universe of EM and which nevertheless is equal to the quiet works of Steve Roach and Michael Stearns. Quiet, but not that much! “Ghost of a Mist” abandons the pure and static rhythms of Dreamscape for sleepy ones which teem of passive sequences. This Ron Boots' 2nd opus on Groove is an intrusion in the clanic atmospheres of the American, or illusory deserts, such as put in music by Roach and Stearns. Flanked of Klaus Hoffmann-Hoock on "Desert Clouds" and fort of a splendid bonus track (Flowing Forces), “Ghost of a Mist” is among these albums that time can’t erode the fragile astral beauty of it.

"Ghost of a Mist (The Sleepwalker)" plunges us into these lunar phases and rhythms with unctuous synth layers which float on a sound fauna black-spotted by quirky tones. They glide over the horizon, between the Earth and its stars, with fine contrasts in their musical tints, going from foggy to iridescent and discreet to evident to increase their swiftness or idleness with the power of our hi-fi volume. Like clouds sailing in infinite, these contemplative strata draw invisible hands which caress the nothingness while percussions in tones of light metal are ringing in an ambiophonic frenzy from where emerges an attractive unrealistic gallop which sways hips such as a solitary cowboy in the dunes of another planet. True to himself, Ron Boots wraps his structures, as much abstracted as rhythmic, of a melodic veil unique at his signature which never stops charming the hearing with a troop of sequences to tones so different than ambiguous. Hypnotic sequences which pound and wriggle by hardly skimming the ground, cutting through a mystic mist coated of distant voices with more incisive and curter movements while taking care of not perturbing the singings of the crystal arpeggios which sing like the reflections of Klaus Schulze on Mirage. And then the nasal synth layers with tones as apocalyptic as philharmonic fill our ears, displaying all the depth of the harmonious approaches of Boots who, whatever it’s on a ambient or rhythmic music, always succeeds in drawing these melodies which roam between the ambiences of Roach and Schulze without getting lost as the breaths in the winds. "In Timeroom Spirits" drops a filet of a Berber synth, introducing a dance of shimmering arpeggios which ring with scattered tom-toms to enchanting clanic trances. Another synth wave shows its charms, awakening the glass arpeggios which clink and draw an enchanting contemplative melody from which each key sings off-key on the knocks of percussions. "In Timeroom Spirits" loses its soft r hythmic and melodic approach to stumble towards a heavy ambient passage where the synth layers are crying to the moon, crystallized in a cold of which the collateral damages let hear some spatial rustles.
Delicate tinkling arpeggios climb the sides of a musical mountain to weave a hypnotic cosmic melody which enters our ears as the vestiges of the tribal works of intergalactic deserts imagined by Steve Roach. Other epic title of “Ghost of a Mist”, "Ghost of a Mist (Ring Mist Mountain)" begins with this delicate oniric approach of dances and spiritual trances from nomads of a planet fill by deserts of clay with soft glass chords which flutter and dance in warm winds, like petals carried by paradisiacal breezes. The first part is bewitching while the second, which is setting to motion at around the 8th minute point, offers a more rebellious approach where percussions strikings replace the arpeggios of glass, harpooning an imperceptible rhythm that only the fluty breaths seem to contain this idle mutiny which bursts on a still rhythm watered by delicious blows of synth in Hispanic aromas. With its heavy approach which lurches between rock and a fed by jerky spasms, "On the Field" so unds out of tune among the fragile ambiences of “Ghost of a Mist”. But as all that Ron Boots touches, the harmonious envelope of synths (which inhale the elegiac blows of Mark Shreeve) that rolls up to the heavy and knocks of percussions, as well as the lascivious hummings of a bass line is of a breathtaking musical wealth. "Flowing Forces" is a bonus track and it’s a wonderful one. Fine sequences and/or percussions resound in the trail of their echoes, drawing a delicious minimalist approach that is very close to Mike Oldfield's tribal serenades, I think in particular from the hollow percussions of Incantations. The synths slather their veils of mist and soft angelic voices which whisper in the harmonies of fine harmonious solos, juxtaposing a sheet of additional emotion on this track which has a profound dreamlike impact. It’s just a great track! "Desert Clouds" parades an intro similar as on "Ghost of a Mist (Ring Mist Mountain)" but with a slower pace. It’s a slow morphic proces sion with arpeggios which ring in each corner of our ears and of which the emotive crescendo is soothing itself among smooth strata in shrouds of mist. The movement gets lost in mists at around the 6th minute to explode violently in the incisive bites of Klaus Hoffmann-Hoock’s guitar from which the violent solos tear all passivity. His solos with twists and angelic bruises run out little by little, renewing the morphic approach of "Desert Clouds" which skips shyly towards a finale where the angels chant in a seraphic universe.

“Ghost of a Mist” is the meeting point between lunar atmospheres and passive rhythms evolving with a minimalist approach drawn in the shade of angelic melodies. Less striking than Dreamscape, this 2nd effort of Ron Boots on Groove is nevertheless an intensely musical work where the Dutch synthesist amazes by his mastery of tribal atmospheres in a musical envelope and where the synths prevail on soft passive sequences but quite even strongly presents. It’s another extremely interesting album that shows another side of Ron Boots who, as usual, has the art to wrap his music of a delicate and beautiful harmonious envelope. To dream about the open eyes!

2012. Sylvain Lupari / gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com Play this album if you're feeling stressed and within a few minutes the mood of the music will take you away to dreamy, tranquil atmospheres. This, in my view highly underrated album, deserves a place in the top 10 of soothing, atmospheric, dreamy albums.
And yet there's nothing new-agey to it. Not counting the last 'power' track with Klaus Hoffmann-Hoock, all tracks have quite some sequences and rhythms but the it all fits within the moods that Ron sets.
It's 'picture music'... Close your eyes and float away in the mist on the moors...
The 2002 bonus track enhances the mood for another 9:20 minutes and blends seamless with the rest of the music.

Kees Aerts "Ghost of a Mist" is the second Ron Boots CD. The cover artwork suggests that Ron is visiting a desert theme. Indeed, there are elements of desert ambience with a quicker pace and an airy atmosphere. This IS a great CD!

Ron's style of placing heavy sequences within the atmospheres leans toward the atmospheric aspects. Those atmospheres are dense and full. "Desert Clouds" features a smokin' rock and roll electric guitar by Klaus Hoffman Hoock.
It is the perfect compliment to Ron's airy ambience. The sudden start shakes listeners and grabs their attention. The piece is the perfect finale as the guitar fades into the drift and becomes a piece of the soundscape. That is where the album gets a desolate desert feel!

Ron is not one to sit still and let it happen. He embraces life and makes it happen!

Jim Brenholts Originally released in 1991 as Boots' second album, additional material (in the form of a 9 minute, previously unreleased track) has been added to this remastered 2002 reissue, bringing the total time to 74 minutes of luscious electronic ambience.
Besides offering a more primal glimpse into Boots' music, this release delivers a softer side of Boots' electronic styling. The compositions are moodier here, more rooted in the ambience of Steve Roach or Michael Stearns than the powerful epics of Boots' more recent works. And yet, Boots introduces his own elegance to these atmospheric soundscapes, injecting subtle power to this peaceful sonic domain.
Languid tonalities sparkle high in a sky comprised of crystalline textures. Pleasant chords and delicate riffs nudge their way into these heavenly passages, delineating the ambience with subtle stamina and endearing personality. To be completely honest, the "ambience" becomes dutifully submerged by these fluid chords and discreet but provocative keyboard sequences. While not rambunctious or rowdy, neither is this music lifeless or drone-heavy minimalism.
Elegant melodies infuse the atmospheric foundation with fanciful sonic notions, elaborating on the basic harmonic threads with uplifting verve. The infrequent presence of majestic percussion also tends to undermine the "ambient" quality of this music, bestowing more than rhythm to the mix.

2002. Matt Howarth / Sonic Curiosity This re-release of "Ghost of a mist", the second solo album by Ron Boots, is going to allow for many fans of the artist and followers of Space music in general to get a brilliant work to their collection, one which in its first edition already awakened a lot of enthusiasm.
The synthesist succeeds in weaving intense melodies, of an oniric air in certain aspects, thrust by powerful sequencers and wrapped in crystalline, luminous textures. The original pieces are accompanied by an extra ("Flowing Forces").
The music flows among passages that are rather slow, though never paused, together with others at a medium speed. There also are soft touches of Symphonic Rock and Techno.

2003. Edgar Kogler Ghost of a Mist was my first exposure to Ron Boots, and remains my favorite CD of his to date. This reissue is a must for anyone who missed it the first time around. Ron has thankfully avoided the pitfalls of musicians like Alan Parsons and Edgar Froese, who have ruined some of their classic works by tinkering, re-editing, or completely re-recording vintage tracks that fans loved in their original form.
This 2002 reissue features slightly redone artwork and the addition of a new track, but the integrity of the original is maintained. What I love so much about this disc is its elegant simplicity, the almost complete avoidance of any touch of excess. For example, "Ghost of a Mist (the Sleepwalker)" builds exactly as it should, taking its time through lovely flowing streams of sound, gradually adding low-key sequencing and soft percussion, setting a perfect mood that carries through the rest of the disc.
The beautiful delicate keys on "In Timeroom Spirits" continue the floating. I continue to be awestruck at how the light rhythms in the background are perfect throughout, never too much or too little. This number also has one of the best uses of silence I've heard, succinctly dividing the track into two discrete movements. It seems like two different works, and yet they are inseparable.
The bonus track, "Flowing Forces", will make this a necessary purchase for Boots' completists who already own the original Ghost.
The extra 9:20 is perfectly placed in the mix between the almost pop "On The Field" and the tour de force finisher "Desert Clouds".

Though new, it does sound as if it belonged there all the while, and is a worthy inclusion. Schulze-like lead lines are a very nice touch, though the emphasis continues to be on moody ethereal textures and light relaxed drum loops. Can a classic be improved upon? In this rare instance, the answer is yes.

2003. Phil Derby / Electroambient Space I spent a few hours listening to the Dutch synthesist Ron Boots. I listened to 3 of Mr Boots CD's Close But Not Touching, Ghost Of A Mist and Different Stories Twisted Tales.
I have to say I didn't realise what a wonderful composer this Gentleman is. The guy is brilliant.

BIG RON is MAGIC. Go out and BUY some BOOTS.

2003. Colin Jouxson !!!!– this thing’s ten years old!!!! So, tell me why it sounds better than most of what is coming out of the Euro-mainland synth fraternity right now.
Bookended by two of the finest tracks you'll hear on any Ron Boots album, complete with a bonus track now giving a total of six tracks and seventy-three minutes running time, this is easily his finest album ever and as good as Euro-mainland synth gets.

The opening track, at 15 minutes, starts with warm layers of rich flowing synths before an undulating electro-percussive sequencer like rhythm slowly emerges as an assortment of synth choirs, lead synth melodies, fuzzed sequencers and more begin to build, the whole soundscape moving deliberately and with purpose, the music filled with emotion and dynamics, and as good an opener as you'll hear.
'In Timeroom Spirits', at nine minutes, is an altogether darker, sombre more reflective affair, too richly textured and well constructed for mere space music.
The fifteen minute title track starts with an oriental feel akin to Ian Boddy’s ‘Jade’ album and runs largely with this feel predominant throughout its slowly meandering course, gentle but firm electro percussive splashes and solid African-sounding drum work emerging to propel the piece slowly on for the final third, as a glorious canopy of string synths flies overhead.
The five minute ‘On The Field’ is a more dramatic, symphonic affair, almost anthemic in many ways, while the nine minute bonus track, ‘Flowing Forces’, mixes oriental sounding percussive work with thudding synth bass, soaring, rich strings and deep undercurrents, all of which give a real flavor of multi-layered melodic splendor to the music. It ends with the album’s eighteen minute "magnum-opus" in the form of ‘Desert Clouds’, featuring no less a musician than Mind Over Matter’s Klaus Hoffman Hock, and it’s strength, the way it builds and the two musicians playing together on multi-synths and electric guitars, is nothing short of mind-blowing for any real synth music fan, building, falling, intensifying, soaring and mellowing out, it’s got huge strength while hardly ever going "over the top" musically.

A splendid album.

2004. Andy G. My friend Hans Sijtsma told me to buy this album. I spent hours to listening 'A Ghost of a Mist' . Really this album I like very much.

2005. Theodoros Sotiropoulos / Greece Originally released in 1991 as Boots' second album, additional material (in the form of a 9 minute, previously unreleased track) has been added to this remastered 2002 reissue, bringing the total time to 74 minutes of luscious electronic ambience.
Besides offering a more primal glimpse into Boots' music, this release delivers a softer side of Boots' electronic styling. The compositions are moodier here, more rooted in the ambience of Steve Roach or Michael Stearns than the powerful epics of Boots' more recent works. And yet, Boots introduces his own elegance to these atmospheric soundscapes, injecting subtle power to this peaceful sonic domain.
Languid tonalities sparkle high in a sky comprised of crystalline textures. Pleasant chords and delicate riffs nudge their way into these heavenly passages, delineating the ambience with subtle stamina and endearing personality. To be completely honest, the "ambience" becomes dutifully submerged by these fluid chords and discreet but provocative keyboard sequences. While not rambunctious or rowdy, neither is this music lifeless or drone-heavy minimalism.
Elegant melodies infuse the atmospheric foundation with fanciful sonic notions, elaborating on the basic harmonic threads with uplifting verve. The infrequent presence of majestic percussion also tends to undermine the "ambient" quality of this music, bestowing more than rhythm to the mix.

2002. Matt Howarth / Sonic Curiosity