1. Twisted Tales [17:04] MP3 soundclip of Twisted Tales [3:00]
  2. Amor Facit [6:19]
  3. The Call [12:35]
  4. Cuivienen [14:58] MP3 soundclip of Cuivienen [3:00]
  5. Gwahir [6:10]
  6. Omnus Mundi [6:19] MP3 soundclip of Omnus Mundi [3:00]
  7. Different Stories [11:05]
Ron Boots' most successful album. Initially released on Cue Records label in 1993, Different Stories and Twisted Tales was vote album of the year by German EM radio show, Schwingungen. Reedited and remixed by Dutch label Groove in 2004, Ron Bootsís 9th opus was concoct with the help of Boots musicians and friends; Harold Van Der Heijden and Guido Negraszus on electronic percussions, smoking guitarist Klaus Hoffmann Hoock on The Call and Eric Van Der Heijden on synths. Old friends and skilled musicians which oversize the melodious approach of Ron Boots on an album to tangents as diversified as surprising.

Loud and resounding pulsating sequences hop and undulate on a spectral synth on Twisted Tales opening, choose as best EM track of 1993. Fine percussions, to industrial typing strikes kind, pierced with difficulty a dense mellotron veil, before solid drum strike start a first heavy and steady rhythmic turn under a sonorous firmament streaks of synthesist shooting stars. The tempo intensifies, answering the percussions which resound in echo for stereo purpose, on a snuggly mellotron and keyboards chords to crystal xylophone sonorities, where Harold Van Der Heijden dexterity can be hear in a slightly atmospheric passage, recalling the universe of Klaus Schulze on Dreams. A moment of tranquility that frees a rich sound force which guides us towards a mind-blowing final where twisted and serpentine synth solos fuse of everywhere, being squabble around percussions which roll on an ambivalent structure becomes definitely more dynamic.
Amor Facit is definitely more ambient. A beautiful track which embraces Steve Roach sonorities, just like the poetic Omnus Mundi, with fine tribal pulsations whose echo forges a light tempo that beats throughout celestial choruses which are snuggling to a rich and enveloping mellotron. A beautiful music piece for tortured hearts.
Written with Klaus Hoffman-Hoock contribution, The Call begins delicately in a bath of arpeggios which scintillate under delicate electronic percussions. Gently the guitar of Hoffmann-Hoock frees chords introducing a very beautiful synth solo, before the electric guitar of the German magician transpierces The Call with beautiful incisive solos, becoming increasingly mordant. A beautiful artistic union which embraces the fragrances of Pink Floyd and Mind Over Matter, especially with the fusion synth, mellotron and guitar, which encloses The Call.
Cuivienen is a superb softness. Romantic and oniric, it flows as a long river of serenity with its astral intro floating around a soft fluty mellotron with enchanting breathes and tender synthesized layers which ripen on a scintillating shroud twinkling of dreamy prisms whose soft solos kiss the sounds of the very first Kitaroís music. A soft title, almost meditative, which gets animate by fine synthesized sparkles and soft pulsations to light resounding timbers pouring towards a cheerful finale, thanks to a piano jazzier that serene, whose keys slice on a mellotron to soft contemplative daydreams.
Bells and a heavy orchestral arrangement initiate Gwahir, whose heavy resounding sequence amplifies the sonority, without ever accentuating the rhythmic part. A heavy title which moves its arpeggios in a sound universe with orchestral ambiguities and on a discrete synth, but whose whistles add an endearing depth.
Different Stories concludes with an electronic approach equivalent to Twisted Tales. A somber passive intro where low pulsations intermingle with heteroclite sonorities under the veils of a sweet mellotron synth and a drum hammers a movement loud and dry, embracing a fine sensual approach with a beautiful base line which palpitates among crystalline notes free of 2 keyboards which subdivide a melody, making contrast with the heaviness of the slow drum strikes. The whole thing evolves/moves in superb sequence approach, encircled the long and sinuous synth solos which zigzag with acuity, among a nebulosity truffle of mellotron choruses.

Different Stories and Twisted Tales canít circumvent in the chess-board of EM. Itís a skillful mixture of kinds which left EM of its minimalism bosom to embrace rhythms in constant permutation, without neglect the harmonious approach so dear to Ron Boots.

2010. Sylvain Lupari / Guts Of Darkness On this album, again with great cover art, both rhythmic and ambient tracks can be found which made Ron Boots one of the most respected electronic musicians in Europe. The first tracks really knocks you over with it's fantastic shifting sequencing.

Bert Strolenberg I spent a few hours listening to the Dutch synthesist Ron Boots. I listened to 3 of Mr Boots CD's Close But Not Touching, Ghost Of A Mist and Different Stories Twisted Tales.
I have to say I didn't realise what a wonderful composer this Gentleman is. The guy is brilliant.

BIG RON is MAGIC. Go out and BUY some BOOTS.

2003. Colin Jouxson I had the chance to work with Ron a bit, and I have never met anybody with such perfect hearing. This album really demonstrates what a genius this man is.
The EM scene of today owes a lot to this man.

2004. Andreas Akwara / Germany Ron Boots adopts in this album a focus perhaps more symphonic and sentimental than the one used in other works of his. Masterfully weaving warm melodies and creating rhythmic structures perfectly integrated in the melodic outline, he succeeds in taking us to a path that joins the human with the divine, light with shadow, euphoria with disenchantment.
The stylistic elements that prevail the most belong to Synth-Pop, Ambient, Space Sequencer Music and New Instrumental Music.
The artist attains a work of great beauty. The album was originally recorded between January 1992 and May 1993. With Boots, collaborated Klaus Hoffmann Hook (Mind Over Matter), Guido Negraszus and Eric van der Heijden.

2004. Hector Jordan This CD from 2004 offers 75 minutes of dynamic electronic music.
Joining Boots on this release are: Klaus Hoffmann Hoock on guitar, Harold van der Heijden and Guido Negraszus on drums, and Eric van der Heijden.
Even the most discriminating audiophile will be captivated from the onset of this CD. Crystalline keyboards tremble with icy clarity, while majestic drums delineate powerfully engaging rhythms. Sparkling electronic embellishments cavort in a gloriously twilight sky, evoking strong promise for an optimistic sunrise. A thrilling drama permeates this song, reaching deep into the human soul to stir legendary courage and bring such emotions cascading to the surface of the audience's mind. The melodic music is wrought with sinewy disposition tempered with humanitarian sympathy, a masterful fusion of strength and compassion that will delight as equally as it mesmerizes. This initial track lasts for 17 minutes, never once allowing its grandeur to abate or diminish for an instant.
The presence of Hoofmann Hoock's rock-styled guitar on the piece "The Call" elevates Boots' customary stratospheric ecstasy to a transcendental scale, injecting fiery riffs to the already vigorous sound. Enormous chords fill the air, creating a glimmering tapestry laced with searing guitar threads that make this a highly memorable and gratifying sonic experience.
All of the tracks on this release exude brilliant compositional talent. Boots' ability to combine atmospheric sensibilities with epic proportion is unparalleled and thoroughly delightful. Few contemporary electronic composers achieve this combination with such ease and rewarding results.

2004. Matt Howarth / Sonic Curiosity I have never been a big fan of the Ron Boots of the eighties, Iím a fan of his work of the late nineties and early years zero.
"Different Stories And Twisted Tales" is an excellent example why this is the case. With the first track of 17 minutes ("Twisted Tales") Boots deserves in my opinion the title ĎThe Dutch Schulzeí: a fine melodic song with a trotting rhythm and regular breaks, delightful, we want more of this, more, more!
After this force it is good to relax with "Amor Facit" which flows smoothly along.
On "The Call" Ron is assisted by guitar-player Klaus Hoffman-Hoock who conjures another fine solo from his instrument.
"Cuivienen" is not such a strong track: (very) tranquil piano and keyboard playing with not much development so the 15 minutes last rather long.
The fifth track "Gwahir", although heavier than the previous one, is more noise than melodic.
"Omnus Mundi" is a typical Schulze-like percussion-oriented song, on which drummer Guido Negraszus plays a leading role with electronic percussion.
The CD concludes with "Different Stories", on which Boots, synthesizer-player Eric van der Heijden and drummer Harold van der Heijden passionately work, in the characteristic manner we are used to from them, to a climax.

Excellent!

2004. Andrť de Waal / SonicImmersion.org Despite the fact that I am familiar with his earlier works "thanks to maneuvers in the dark",on Belgian Radio deleted without any respect to its listeners, When I return from any holiday this is the one I play asap. It make's me feel "good". Of course some of his later works are better, but this is the one that teases me.

2005. Jeff Wouters / belgium Excellent album. One of my favourite electronic albums.

2005. Theodoros Sotiropoulos / Greece Different Stories and Twisted Tales is a documentary, of sorts, by Ron Boots. He has spun a yarn of about how tales become legends and how individual lives are, in and of themselves, tales and legends. Ron creates the story-telling mood by mixing Berlin school sequences with dense atmospheres. Track 3, The Call, features a smoking electric guitar by Klaus Hoffman Hoock. The guitar is a dynamic compliment to the atmosphere. Ronís overall diversity allows for dark AND pastoral atmospheres. The darkness is heavy and overt. The pastorales are dense without relying on new age or symphonic textures. They rely on Ronís innovative use of sequences to create lightness. That unique texture is awesome and essential!

2001. Jim Brenholts