1. Prologue [2:46]
  2. Rain of Fire [9:24] MP3 soundclip of Rain of fire [3:00]
  3. Smoke - Cluster [3:34]
  4. Concorde Forever [9:40] MP3 soundclip of Concorde forever [3:00]
  5. Tears of Maria Barbara Bach [8:54]
  6. Midnight Runner [6:47]
  7. Purple and Flexible [6:50]
  8. Pacific Lover [6:20] MP3 soundclip of Pacific lover [3:00]
  9. Eve [10:17]
  10. Solid Water [4:42]
  11. Anna Magdalena's Notebook [2:37]
  12. First kiss [5:55]
  13. Epilogue [1:51]
All material recorded and mixed at POeM Studio by Can Atilla during November 2004-January 2005
Composed and performed by Can Atilla

Can Atilla - keyboards, drumms
Katia Dzjbaicha - voice on track 1
Mustafa Cihan Aslan - alto sax on track 2 and 9
Murat Yücel - electric guitar on track 4
James Watkins - voice on track 4
Cagatay Akyol - alto recorders on track 5
Faria - vocals on track 8

The Turkish musician Can Atilla has many musical faces. One of his most important faces is, when he captures the sound and impact of one of the most influential electronic music bands in his music, Tangerine Dream. On earlier albums, he has already done that with great result and on "Concorde", an ode to that great plane, he has explored this even more and reached his top so far.
In the "Prologue" of the album, Can opens with a nice ambient piece after which the sequences and wonderful basses take over in "Rain Of Fire".
Cihan Aslan plays the alto sax in this fine melodically track. Melodically is a word that returns on this album on every track. The music is rather easy accessible and has great melodies. Can certainly knows what he is doing.
"Concorde Forever" (with Murat Yücel on electric guitar and the voice of James Watkins), "Eve" and "First Kiss" bring back the happy memories of Tangerine Dream of the eighties.
"Tears Of Maria Barbara Bach" is a wonderful melancholic piece. It contains a fine mixture between Atilla’s electronics and the alto recorders of Çagatay Akyol.
In "Pacific Lover" the voice of Faria can be heard. Hearing this, nothing less can be said about Can that he is one of the most interesting electronic musicians of this time.
The music of Can Atilla is not only an homage to the Concorde and to the music of Tangerine Dream but also an homage to great melodically electronic music that is very much alive.

Press Information A hommage to the retired 'Concorde'. With Mach2 Can Atilla takes us on a supersonic flight that reminds me not only of a famous aeroplane but also of a famous EM group. That's TD2 @ Mach2

2005. Lothar Lubitz Can Atilla is back with his fourth album & once again he insists on wearing his influences very close to his sleeve, namely mid 80s TD. It's all down to that harpsichord sound that TD used so often back in the day & which is just as widespread here.

That's not to say that the tracks which uses it aren't good ones as "Concorde Forever" & the rhythmically strong "Eve" (which further benefits from some nice sax work) both provide some fine listening while "First Kiss", which, too all intents & purposes, closes the album (ignoring the short "Epilogue") is a nicely reflective piece that touches the heart.
Likewise the quasi-Mellotron sounds that grace "Purple & Flexible" & "Solid Water" do add a nicely atmospheric touch but I can't help feeling that if he'd only take the chance he could take his music into totally new realms.
There are hints of what he could achieve with the wordless female voice that adds an extra exotic feel to "Pacific Lover", the Turkish-style violin that graces the opening "Prologue" & the lush soundscape that graces "Tears Of Maria Barbara Bach" all being steps in the right direction but then comes "Midnight Runner" & all you're really thinking is doesn't, this sound like "Lily On The Beach?"'. Again this is not a bad track (the end section proving particularly good) but I fail to see how someone as talented as Atilla obviously is can be satisfied with sounding like TD for the rest of his life, especially when his homeland offers such a rich musical heritage that, if mixed with the best of what EM has to offer, could really prove a mind-blowing experience.

Carl Jenkinson "Concorde" is an album that mix the 1970s (represented by the Concorde aircraft of the title) analog synths magic with sophisticated Synth-Pop. On the whole, this album has a great emotional load. Using the synthesizers in an unusually warm way, the composer creates melodies full of symphonism and strength. The music flyes towards otherworldly landscapes, at times with melancholy touches, at times optimistic, always very expressive. In all, 13 magnificent themes in which the artist proves his talent.

2005. Edgar Kogler This release from 2005 offers 80 minutes of epic electronic music.
Joining Atilla on this recording are: Mustafa Cihan Aslan on saxophone, Murat Yucel on guitar, Cagatay Akyol on recorders, and Katia Dzjbaicha, James Watkins, and Faria on vocals.

Highly expressive electronics are initiated and guided into gripping melodies by nimble-fingered keyboards. High end timbres are superbly blended with bass tones to achieve a remarkably well-rounded resonance. There’s a constant stream of exemplary melodies that mesmerize and thrill without fail. Chords flash by with vibrant delivery, making visceral impressions, only to make way for the next barrage of delightful riffs.
Majestic rhythms imbue the tracks with even more vigor. Although only appearing in one track, the guitar displays an astounding presence, searing the heart with its astral pyrotechnics. The saxophone is featured in two tracks, lending a fervent passion to those pieces.
The most notable aspect of Atilla’s music, though, is his meticulous dedication to awe-inspiring riffs couched in enthralling melodies. He is definitely blessed with an abundance of topnotch creativity. The music on this release all centers around observations dealing with the Concorde airliner, from dazzling velocities to stratospheric voyages to humble passengers to flights that serve to reunite lovers.
There’s a particular deep vibration that Atilla utilizes that tickles the soul, evoking inspiring altitudes filled with ghostly mechanical bees. He mixes it into his compositions with playful abandon, invariably adding a touch of grandeur to his already grandiose music.

Atilla is pursuing a sound forged by Tangerine Dream during the Nineties, and frankly he is doing a far better job with it than they did.

2005. Matt Howarth / Sonic Curiosity Basta un po' di inventiva e anche il volo di un aereo può essere fonte di ispirazione musicale. Se il viaggio e il mezzo di trasporto spesso sono ottime condizioni per l'elaborazione delle idee, più raro è che dal rumore e dal rombo di un Concorde venga fuori della musica.
Ma Can Atilla ci ha provato e il suo "Concorde", pubblicato nel 2005 dai tipi della Groove, è un 'opera interessante, colonna sonora di un viaggio aereo.
Ideale miscela di synth-pop, scuola berlinese ed elettronica anni '80, l'album di Atilla stupisce perchè segue un percorso un po' diverso dalle consuete produzioni dell'etichetta di Ron Boots. Basta ascoltare l'imponente sequenza iniziale "Prologue"/"Rain of fire"/"Smoke-Cluster", una perfetta presentazione dell'opera del tastierista turco, che tra l'altro si circonda di musicisti che completano il lavoro, dando un tocco di varietà decisamente azzeccato (penso alle reminiscenze orientali di "Pacific lover").
Fortissime a tratti le influenze dei Tangerine Dream ottantiani ("Eve"), di Jarre e del nostro Perrino; si trovano anche interessanti assonanze con un progetto americano come Echo Us.
Etereo ma "di sostanza", suggestivo e coinvolgente (penso a "Concorde forever", ricca di scatti e mutamenti, l'intensa "Midnight runners"), sperimentale in alcuni episodi ("Purple and flexible") l'album di Atilla sarà sicuramente apprezzato da tutti i cultori dell'elettonica più melodica e vicina a certo spirito anni '80/'90.

2005. Donato Zoppo With his Concorde album Can Atilla performed an intense work which features nice tracks. I would like to see this album as a unique piece of work featuring his own way in fact, but it reminds me many roots from TD like the previous albums. Coming from such a rich culture, this Turkish artist should have produced tracks with his own way in my opinion. If I need to listen to TD, I would go and buy them directly why to buy Can Atilla.. He was generally named as a TD clone in EM platform, and this time it seems that he proved this expression..

2006. Daniel Steinberg / Germany Turkish musician Can Atilla is often compared to both Jean-Michel Jarre and Tangerine Dream. On most of Concorde, I feel as though I am listening to a dead ringer for TD from the late eighties. This cd could have easily been released between Optical Race and Lily On The Beach and be taken for the genuine article from Paul Haslinger and Edgar Froese.

Case in point is "Midnight Runner", full of synth drums, the ubiquitous harpsichord patch, and a pop-rock feel with lots of melodic hooks.
Two tracks, "Tears of Maria Barbara Bach" and "Anna Magdalena's Notebook", could be pop ballads, the latter reminiscent of "Ghazal" from TD’s Optical Race.
"Concorde Forever" reminds me of Ian Boddy’s title track from The Deep. Boddy listed several facts about the world’s oceans; Atilla recites, via guest James Watkins, the cruising speed, altitude, and various and sundry other facts and figures about the Concorde jet. Once the melody takes off (sorry, couldn't resist), it again begs comparisons to the same period of TD, except for a cool electric guitar solo.
"Rain of Fire" pays homage to TD around 1995, courtesy of saxophone in the style of Linda Spa. This is a particularly strong track, with great sequencing. That’s not to say that everything here sounds exactly like something else.
"Purple and Flexible" is an energetic piece that sounds a bit like eighties TD in the latter part, but there are other elements that don't sound like any particular e-musician.
Same goes for "Smoke – Cluster", a moody atmospheric track that I like a lot, and another cool ambient piece called "Solid Water".

Can Atilla knows how to make emotive, upbeat melodic EM, and Concorde again succeeds in that regard.

Phil Derby / Electroambient Space The Turkish musician Can Atilla has many musical faces. One of his most important faces is when he captures the sound and impact of Tangerine Dream. On earlier albums, he has already done that on "Concorde", and as an ode to that great plain, he has explored this even more.
In the "Prologue" of the album, Can opens with a nice ambient piece, after which the sequences and wonderful bass lines take over in "Rain Of Fire". Cihan Aslan plays the alto sax on this fine melodic track.
`Melodic’ is a word that returns on every track of this album. The music is easily accessible and has great melodies. Certainly Can knows what he is doing.
"Concorde Forever" (with Murat Yücel on electric guitar and the voice of James Watkins), "Eve" and "First Kiss" bring back the happy memories of Tangerine Dream of the 1980s.
"Tears Of Maria Barbara Bach" is a wonderful melancholic piece. It contains a fine mixture of Atilla’s electronics and the alto recorders of Çagatay Akyol.
In "Pacific Lover" the voice of Faria can be heard.
The music of Can Atilla is not only homage to the Concorde and to the music of Tangerine Dream, but also it is homage to great melodic electronic music.

Paul Rijkens / SonicImmersion.org