1. GERT EMMENS & JAMES CLENT - Vintage Contemporaries [7:11] MP3 soundclip of Vintage contemporaries (Emmens/Clent) [1:00]
  2. CREATE - Red Alert [2:52]
  3. STEPHEN PARSICK - A Molecular Surge [6:07]
  4. GERT BLOKZIJL - Monopology [6:54]
  5. RUSSELL STOREY - Cosmic Kiwi III [0:42]
  6. SYNTH.NL - Synthology [4:56]
  7. FRANÇOIS-POL CORNEC - Sea Click [5:19]
  8. ERWIN HOFSTEDE - Solina [2:23]
  9. JAMES J CLENT - Ambiology [4:31]
  10. RUSSELL STOREY - Cosmic Kiwi III [3:06]
  11. TERJE WINTHER - Familiar Surprises [4:25]
  12. STUDIO35D - Probe One [4:31]
  13. SCHÖNWÄLDER'S FILTERKAFFEE - Analogum [7:31]
  14. ERIC G - In the Moog [3:46] MP3 soundclip of In the moog (Eric G) [1:00]
  15. René van der Wouden - Ceci n'est pas un Analogue [3:13]
  16. MONO-POLY - Semdrone (Spaceship One Edit) [4:11]
  17. RON BOOTS - Analowho [7:54] MP3 soundclip of Analowho (Ron Boots) [1:00]
In 2005 and 2006 under the title "Analogy, Volume 1" and "Volume 2", two compilation-cd’s came out with unreleased material from a diversity of interesting electronic musicians. The assignment was to create a piece only using analog equipment. The cd was a product of members of the Internet-discussion group about electronic music, "EMforum".
Both cd’s were a success. Though the forum doesn't exist anymore, the spirit is still there and therefore a third volume has been released dedicated to the forum and all the people that have been part of it. Collaborating artists are, amongst others: Ron Boots, Gert Emmens, Mario Schönwälder, Stephen Parsick, Terje Winther and Create. The cd contains seventeen tracks with a varying approach.
"Vintage Contemporaries" by Emmens & James Clent already shows familiar paths with sequences and Mellotron sounds. The sequences in Gert Blokzijl’s "Monopology", played only on a Korg MonoPoly synthesizer, are wonderful. One synth is also the way Studio35D (=René Splinter) works on his "Probe One" (a SCI Pro One) but then with a more eighties aim. Erwin Hofstede even plays a whole piece, the warm "Solina", with just a Solina string ensemble. Others create ambiences (Parsick, Russell Storey). "Analogum" is an excellent track from Schönwälder’s Filterkaffee, a new project by Mario. And, of course, there is also Ron Boots who plays a recognizable composition "Analowho". This third edition is the best in the series. Let’s hope it does keep that EM-spirit alive.

2007. Press Information This is the third volume of the "Analogy"-series, which started about three years ago as sort of "fun project" on EMForum.
Since the first album, it appeared there were far enough enthusiastic contributors from all over the globe who were more than willing or daring to find out if they could come up with a mature composition made with only real analogue instruments. Well, I can tell you this third installment has become another great release, containing a collection of 17 uninterrupted tracks presenting a wide range of retro soundings from the old days of EM.

Things are nicely kicked off with a vintage track by Gert Emmens and James Clent, before things move into some great atmospheric soundings of Create or the dripping, dense textures of Stephen Parsick.
Gert Blokzijl’s composition "Monopology" brings the old Schulze-days in mind, while Synth.NL’s "Synthology" is a warm drifting piece with nice textures and solo-voice before a Jarre-like sound steps forward in "Solina" by Erwin Hofstede.
The other tracks on the album continue in the same high level of inspired sounding music, which were all mastered and perfectly merged by Ron Boots (who also very nicely closes the album with the warm, embracing "Analowho".

Let here be no doubt "Analogy 3" is another must-have for any electronic music fan!

Bert Strolenberg / Sonic Immersion Got it today and it is BRILLIANT!!! Love them all, but the second is better than the first and the third is absolutely the best. Some tracks are a bit too short for my taste (maybe I just can't get enough of them :-) ). And Ron is way too modest to put his piece in the very end as it's one of the best on the album.
Count me in for the fourth if it ever happens :-). Best of luck and keep up the good work!

2007. Andy Various artists compilations never hook that much. Too many times it use great names in a middle of pure unknowns making us buy an average album where we can only find 2 or 3 good tracks. It is all the opposite with Analogy 3.
Thanks to a superb mastering from Ron Boots, Analogy 3 offers an extremely astonishing musical homogeneity. An opus of a great artistic creativity where all titles are connected in a progressive evolution on rhythms with always captivating sound effects that intersect atmospheric moments, sometimes intense sometimes ethereal, always bordering the charms of electronic analog music.

Gert Emmens and James Clent tackle this compilation with a title in the purest Emmens tradition. Vintage Contemporaries is dressed of beautiful whirring sequences which overlap an undulating rhythm, with analog sound effects which palpitate on the yelling and jazzy synths of Gert Emmens. In 7 minutes, Emmens explores with wonder its musical style which is one of the florets of the contemporary EM.
Following are 2 titles with eerie atmospheres. If Red Alert has a hatched sonority, A Molecular Surge is with Ramp’s imprints, loud and intriguing on a dark structure.
Astonishing, Gert Blokzijl offers a heavy title which moves as a train that furrows kilometres of tunnel.
The atmosphere of Monopology is heavy on a rhythm with the ceaseless loops.
Synths with nervous arpeggios are enveloping and create a rich climate which rests on short Cosmic Kiwi from Russell Story.
A short moment of lull which is followed the slow and sensual Synthology from Synth.NL, an interesting artist discovered this year. Synthology offers a progressive impulsion on a melodious movement near lounge jazz savour.
A beautiful track which is follow by the infatuation Sea Click from François-Pol Cornec. Simply an amazing and static track with circular keys draped of loud, but weakened, synths giving a musical aura very close to Schulze works, languorous synths in less. A great surprise and an excellent title.
Moreover, the further we go into this compilation more the musical structures become heavy and progressive. The ambient moments are always present, but they reveal a rich and extremely varied atmospheric character, like Solina, Cosmic Kiwi III and Semdrone.
Other titles are explosive like Ambiology, Probe One with its touch of slow and heavy techno, In the Moog from Eric G who is very in conformity with his superb opus Conclusion.
And the good old recipe of a progressive EM, with rich atmospheres and random impulsions are presents on the superb Familiar Surprises, Analogum, Ceci n'est pas un Analogue and the melodious Analowho from Ron Boots, which buckles this compilation like Emmens and Clent had begun it.

Analogy 3 is a superb collection which is listened from start to end, without faults or nasty surprises. A great studio work and mastering, with surprisingly strong material for a compilation, shows the professionalism of Groove which always innovate in the design of their products.
One of the beautiful albums of EM in 2007.

2007. Sylvain Lupari / Guts Of Darkness This CD from 2007 features 79 minutes of diverse electronic music.
The theme of this anthology is that all the equipment used to create the music be of an analog nature.

You get:
Gert Emmens and James Clent: a tasty blend of deep gurgling and stratospheric airs serving as a foundation for a fanciful melody.
Create: a pensive piece that seasons cybernetic brooding with delicate filigrees.
Stephen Parsick (from ‘Ramp): dark ambience that delves into celestial depths with moody results.
Gert Blokzijl: loops ascend with lighthearted vigor to expand their circumference into realms of bubbling zest.
Russell Storey: a brief excursion into cosmic territory.
Synth.nl: a windswept journey into contemplation that slides into a peppier selection of bouncy chords and languid bass sweeps.
Francois-pol Cornec: electronic bubbles punctuate a bouncy melody drenched in rich tones that erupts with shrill dynamics.
Erwin Hofstede: atmospheric textures sway across a sparse panorama.
James J. Clent: a peppy piece with resounding clatter and serpentine riffs sliding through a vivacious mix.
Another track by Russell Storey: that expands on the previous cosmic journey with subtle determination.
Terje Winther: an energetic track that increases the heartbeat with lively chords racing to expose further surprises.
Studio35d: a chugging melody struggles to escape the clutches of a pensive mood.
Schonwalder’s Filterkaffe (being Mario Schonwalder and Frank Rothe): locomotive chords flow through a series of dramatic augmentations en route to an emphatic crescendo.
Eric G: urgency drives this frenetic tune.
René van der Wouden: a celebratory track with a bouncy central theme seasoned by gurgling embellishments.
Mono-Poly: a brooding atonal piece of grinding gears and muttering radio signals.
Ron Boots: a slowburn escalation heading faithfully for emphatic altitudes with a poignant finale.

On one hand, you get a worthwhile selection of exclusive tracks by notable musicians. On the other hand, you get glimpses at the works of a variety of promising newcomers.
A well-rounded and rewarding collection.

Matt Howarth / Sonic Curiosity First up on Analogy Volume 3 is "Vintage Contempories", a cute oxy moronic title from Gert Emmens and James Clent. Emmens’ synth solos are readily identifiable from the outset, and strong sequencing and choirs complete the package.
Create’s "Red Alert" is next, a short piece with a metallic tincture.
Stephen Parsick brings "A Molecular Surge", low rumbling darkness in keeping with his doombient themes of late.
Newcomer Gert Blokzijl presents "Monopology", with familiar but nonetheless cool retro styling with sequences galore. I'd love to hear a whole album of this!
Of course, each Analogy album has to have Russell Storey’s continuing "Cosmic Kiwi" series, and both parts here are good, although the first is over almost before it begins.
Synth.NL’s playful but low-key "Syntholology" is next, which I like a lot, really nice synth sounds throughout.
"Sea Click" is a bubbly little number by Francois-Pol Cornec that has me wanting to hear more of him also. Sweeping majestic synths take over midway through, a cross between Vangelis and Jean-Michel Jarre, a good combination indeed.
Speaking of Jarre, I’d swear I’m listening to a rare out take from Oxygene or Equinoxe on Erwin Hofstede’s "Solina," a beautifully understated piece.
James Clent goes solo on "Ambiology", which has a fantastic rhythmic foundation on which to build. The disc seems to just keep getting better as it goes.
Terje Winther’s "Familiar Surprises" has a bouncy, punchy little sequence, nicely mixed with a gentle synth solo and warm string sounds.
Studio35D’s "Probe One" has a raw edge to the main synth sound that propels it along, good bite there.
Mario Schönwälder has done a variety of solo and collaborative works, and this time under the name Schönwälder’s Filterkaffee he records "Analogum" with Frank Rothe. It’s classic Berlin school all the way, very TD-like, fantastic sequencing especially.
Eric G dedicates "In the Moog" to Jean-Michel Jarre, and it’s easy to see why, originally recorded in 1978 and inspired by Oxygene. I didn’t really intend to describe all 17 songs in the review, but they are all so good and I've only got three to go.
René van der Wouden’s tune features a playful bright sequence and Mellotron-like strings, though it is interesting to hear the Mellotron played legato.
Mono-Poly’s "SemDrone" sounds like a cool old sci-fi movie snippet, and perhaps it is, though the background dialogue is difficult to make out.
Finally, we come to "Analowho" by Ron Boots, a man who knows a thing or two about synthesizers, analog and otherwise. It is the longest and perhaps best piece, great melody, rhythm and of course sequencing.

Volume 4, anyone?

2008. Phil Derby / Electroambient Space A new, excellent anthology of electronic music by high octane numbers, with the use of analogic synthesizers as a common trait to all themes. Though the styles vary quite a bit, depending on each artist, most of the music has got an innovative character, and the most developed genre is Space Music.

The contents of the album is as follows:
Gert Emmens & James Clent: "Vintage Contemporaries". Create: "Red Alert". Stephen Parsick: "A Molecular Surge". Gert Blokzijl: "Monopology". Russell Storey: "Cosmic Kiwi I II". Synth.Nl: "Synthology". François-Pol Cornec: "Sea Click". Erwin Hofstede: "Solina". James J Clent: "Ambiology". Russell Storey: "Cosmic Kiwi I II". Terje Winther: "Familiar Surprises". Studio35d: "Probe One". Schonwalder's Filterkaffee: "Analogum". Eric G: "In The Moog". René van der Wouden: "Ceci N'est Pas Un Analogue". Mono-Poly: "Semdrone (Spaceship One Edit)". Ron Boots: "Analowho".

Although all the tracks have a good quality, the track that has impressed me the most is "Analogum" by Schonwalder's Filterkaffee.

2008. Edgar Kogler And you thought it was over? Heck no, there's another one for you. It's Analogy, Volume 3 - the new and possibly final chapter of the legendary series of samplers released by the Groove Unlimited label. The concept remains the same: make music with analogue instruments only, and use as little instrumentation as possible. This time a plethora of new names can be spotted, along with the "usual suspects" (EM mainstays, that is).

Gert Emmens and James Clent begin the journey with fat analogue bass sequence and melancholic Mellotron strings. The track is called "Vintage Contemporaries" and the music suits the title very well. If you enjoy classic Berlin School stuff, you will love this composition! Sequences, pads, and a mournful CS-80 harmonica solo is all you need for a terrific starter. After a while, an electronic rhythm kicks in, along with a great Jazzy solo. This is one monster of an EM track - a real musical journey!
Create continues with the atmospheric "Red Alert". Fat, resonating synth sounds are combined with Mellotron choirs to great effect. This is a short (under 3 minutes) but epic EM track that will be liked by all fans of analogue synthesis. There is a fat solo in there as well.
Stephen Parsick gives us "A Molecular Surge". This track is built like a Dark Ambient piece - it's all pure sound design, with no real melody or rhythm. An expansive, deep electronic soundscape that I enjoyed a lot.
Gert Blokzijl is a new name to me, and he gives us "Monopology", created exclusively with a Korg Mono/Poly synthesizer. Metallic tones develop into full-fledged synthesizer effects, as a bass sequence comes to the surface. Wow, what a great sound - rich, warm and purely analogue! It's amazing how much one instrument can do in the right hands! You will hear pads, sequences, effects - all arranged into a cohesive whole.
Russell Storey continues his trademark "Cosmic Kiwi" series with Part III. Spacey wind effects and unusual bleeps is all it is about, really. The track lasts for 40 seconds only.
Synth.nl aka Michel van Osenbruggen gives us "Synthology" - a melodic piece, filled with whooshing sounds, a slow bass line, and a playful analogue lead sound. An asserting sequence comes and goes, while a melodic lead line departs and then returns, this time embellished by additional / supporting sounds.
Francois-Pol Cornec continues with "Sea Click". After a brief introduction one can hear a bass line straight out of "The Thing" soundtrack. Soon a sequence appears, while most other sounds fade to silence. A gliding lead line bursts forth, making this a solemn and heroic piece, or so it sounds to me. Interesting composition and somewhat different from the rest.
Erwin Hofstede prepared a special gift: a short track, filled with nothing else than a warm, phased Solina sound. Ahhhh.... heaven! If this doesn't send shivers down your spine, nothing will.
James J. Clent has cooked something else in the form of "Ambiology": heavy slow sequences are complimented by a relaxed rhythm of the Jazzy variety. I know it's not your typical Berlin School piece, but I thought it was still a very competent melodic EM composition. There's even a great steel guitar solo on this one. And why not? Another winner.
Russell Storey returns to feed us some more abstract spaciness with his "Cosmic Kiwi III Part 2". This is probably my favourite of all the "Cosmic Kiwis". The sounds here are really unusual and great.
"Familiar Surprises" from Terje Winther follows with intriguing, sharp sequences, Minimoog solos and warm pads. This is excellent and unique Berlin School track, As Terje points out, he wanted to make an atypical track with familiar elements. He did succeed, as I really thought it was a whimsical and very interesting composition, a bit rough around the edges but still highly satisfying.
Studio35D follows with a track made exclusively with a Sequential Circuits Pro-One synthesizer, aptly titled "Probe One". Heavy marching bass throb is combined with sharp rhythms and analogue melodic lines. It's amazing how versatile these vintage instruments are - the range of sounds here is great! This little synth does all the drums, cymbals, basses, effects, indescribable experimental sounds, solos and everything in-between.
Mario Schonwalder is a guy that needs no introduction. Together with Frank Rothe, armed with a Memotron (a digital replica of Mellotron), an Alesis Andromeda synth and an analogue sequencer, he makes a classic-sounding Berlin School track with urgent sequences, tron choirs, solos and a few effects. Sounds simple? Yes! Is it indeed simple? Yes! Does it make the track less enjoyable? Hell no! It's what you craved - pure and unashamed EM. This track just rocks!
"In the Moog" is a familiar 1978 piece from Eric G (it is included on his solo album "Conclusion"). The instrumentation is 100% analogue, and the melody is 100% "Oxygene". Need I say more?
René van der Wouden kicks in with a 80's Synth-pop influenced number titled "Ceci n'est pas un Analogue". If you take 1980's style bass line, combine it with Mellotron strings, EMS-like effects and a few melodic sequences, you'll pretty much have what this track is all about.
Mono-Poly gives us "Semdrone" - a track made exclusively with modular synthesizers, except for voices, and I must say there are plenty of them. The modular synthesis is restricted to abstract effects and drones. It's perhaps the most experimental track on "Analogy 3". Intriguing!
The album concludes with a track by Ron Boots titled "Analowho". Warm analogue string sounds serve as a comfortable bed for sparkling effects, solos and great sequences. It's an emotional and nostalgic piece that takes us back to the golden age of Electronic Music. Music is art. Art is timeless. And Analogy is timeless, too.

As both Analogy Volume 1 and Analogy Volume 2 were very well received by the Electronic Music fans, it was decided to do at least one more volume of this (now legendary) compilation. The concept of Analogy includes making music exclusively with real analogue instruments, both old or new. Because of that, there's a certain "warm" feeling about the music on these samplers, a feeling we all love so much. Shortly after Analogy 2 was released, the EMforum, that really spawned (and isnprired) the series, ceased to exist. However, we all remember the great time we had communicating on this board and the great role this forum (the first of its kind) played in the lives of so many Electronic Music fans. It is only natural, therefore, to dedicate Analogy 3 to the EMforum and all the people who were part of it. Although the forum itself was just a flash in the history of EM, the music itself lives on. And it will certainly become part of our hearts. Besides, the Analogy series is a good way to discover talents, as this latest volume clearly shows.
Now sit back, relax and enjoy, as Sonic Steve would say!

2007. Artemi Pugachov In 2005 and 2006 under the title "Analogy Vol. 1" and "Analogy Vol. 2", two compilation CD's released by Groove Unlimited came out with unreleased material from a diversity of interesting electronic musicians. The assignment was to create a piece only using analog equipment. The CD's were a product of the members of the Internet discussion group about electronic music, "EMforum".
Both CD's were a success. Though the forum doesn't exist anymore, the spirit is still there and therefore a last third volume has been released dedicated to the forum and all the people that have been part of it. This CD contains 17 tracks with a varying musical approach.

First up is "Vintage Contemporaries", a cute oxy moronic title from Gert Emmens and James Clent. Emmens' synth solos are readily identifiable from the outset, and strong sequencing and choirs complete the package.
Create's "Red Alert" is next, a short piece with a metallic tincture.
Stephen Parsick brings "A Molecular Surge", low rumbling darkness in keeping with his doombient themes of late. Newcomer Gert Blokzijl presents "Monopology", with familiar but nonetheless cool retro styling with sequences galore. I'd love to hear a whole album of this!
Of course, each "Analogy" album has to have Russell Storey's continuing "Cosmic Kiwi" series, and both parts here are good, although the first is over almost before it begins.
Synth.NL's playful but low-key "Syntholology" is next, which I like a lot, really nice synth sounds throughout.
"Sea Click" is a bubbly little number by Francois-Pol Cornec that has me wanting to hear more of him also. Sweeping majestic synths take over midway through, a cross between Vangelis and Jean-Michel Jarre, a good combination indeed.
Speaking of Jarre, I'd swear I'm listening to a rare out take from Oxygene or Equinoxe on Erwin Hofstede's "Solina", a beautifully understated piece. James Clent goes solo on "Ambiology", which has a fantastic rhythmic foundation on which to build. The disc seems to just keep getting better as it goes.
Terje Winther's "Familiar Surprises" has a bouncy, punchy little sequence, nicely mixed with a gentle synth solo and warm string sounds.
Studio35D's "Probe One" has a raw edge to the main synth sound that propels it along, good bite there.
Mario Schönwälder has done a variety of solo and collaborative works, and this time under the name Schönwälder's Filterkaffee he records "Analogum" with Frank Rothe. It's classic Berlin school all the way, very TD-like, fantastic sequencing especially.
Eric G dedicates "In The Moog" to Jean-Michel Jarre, and it’s easy to see why, originally recorded in 1978 and inspired by Oxygene.
René van der Wouden's "Ceci N'Est Pas Un Analogue" features a playful bright sequence and Mellotron-like strings, though it is interesting to hear the Mellotron played legato.
Mono-Poly's "SemDrone" sounds like a cool old sci-fi movie snippet, and perhaps it is, though the background dialogue is difficult to make out.
Finally, we come to "Analowho" by Ron Boots, a man who knows a thing or two about synthesizers, analog and otherwise. It is the longest and perhaps best piece, great melody, rhythm and of course sequencing.

On one hand, you get a worthwhile selection of exclusive tracks by notable musicians. On the other hand, you get glimpses at the works of a variety of promising newcomers.
A well-rounded and rewarding collection. Highly recommended.

2010. Dante Gambino Vilarrubias Bong!, fait la tête du chroniqueur qui rentre dans le panneau de l'album tant attendu. Car, après le volume 2 qui fait partie de mes CDs préférés dans l'absolu, j'ai bien dû déchanter à l'écoute de celui-ci. Car le 3ème (et sans doute dernier) exercice de ce style mis sur les rails par Ron Boots déçoit. Pourtant les protagonistes (Gert Emmens, Stephen Parsick, Stephen Humphries, l'écurie Groove pour résumer) sont les mêmes, pourtant les styles abordés et la méthode utilisée sont identiques. A contrario, la sauce ne prend pas. Il manque ce catalyseur, ce petit éclat de génie qui fait qu'un CD reste englué à la platine qui le réceptionne. Même le morceau final, pourtant de la main de Ron Boots lui-même, n'arrive pas à remettre le bateau à flot dans un dernier baroud.

Cela laisse craindre le pire pour son prochain album, annoncé pour le trimestre prochain. Dès lors, prions pour conjurer le mauvais sort.

2010. LouLou / Prog-résiste